Iyyon Stream

Region: North, Track Duration: 1-2 Hours, Starting Point: Ayun Bridge, Metula, Ending Point: Hatanur Fall, Metula, Track Type: Walking
Source: Israel Nature and Parks Authority
Region: North
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After dozens of years in which the stream ran dry in summer due to Lebanon's diversion of the waters, the Nature and Parks Authority took action to renew the flow in the stream with the help of water pumped in from Nahal Dan, in order to rehabilitate the unique Nahal Ayun eco-system.

Day camping area for picnics in the northern area of the stream.

The gorge of Nahal Ayun and its waterfalls: Ayun Falls, the Mill Falls, the Cascades, and the Tanur Waterfall.

Pump at En Sukhra

Seasonal flowering of the Maritime Squill (Drimia Maritina)

The Tanur Lookout Point (Gafni) - observation point towards the Tanur Waterfall and downstream

Southern day-camping/parking area for picnics, and three paddling pools

Wheelchair-accessible path, for disabled persons and for children's strollers, from the day camping area up to the area of the Tanur Waterfall.

Ensuring the flow of water in summer - Nahal Ayun is a perennial stream that flows all year round. In the 20th century, Lebanese farmers began to exploit all the waters of the springs during the summer months and the Israeli part of the stream began to run dry in those months. For many years the falls would dry up in summer and the fish survived only in a number of deep shady pools. In the absence of a political solution for releasing the waters of the spring to flow in the stream, the Nature and Parks Authority initiated an artificial flow of water in the summer months by digging wells in the region of Nahal Dan and allowing the water to flow into Nahal Ayun. This project was begun in 2009 and has continued since then every year.

Monitoring species of fauna and flora in the reserve - in the waters of the stream live various species of invertebrates, some of them very rare. When water was fed artificially into the reserve in summer there was a concern that some of the unique natural values of the reserve would be accidentally harmed. In order to prevent such harm, seasonal studies and surveys are constantly conducted in the reserve, with the aim of examining the effect of the artificial flow of water on the sensitive eco-system. Certain groups of fauna are especially monitored: fish, water snails (the freshwater mollusc Melanopsis praemorsa) and others.

Interface with agriculture - the reserve borders on private agricultural land. Over the years there has been significant "agricultural pressure" on the reserve - agricultural land clearance for the expansion of plantations that intruded on the edges of the reserve area, and illegal hunting and trapping within and on the edges of the reserve. These occurrences require continuous supervision in order to stop ongoing damage to the reserve.
Protection of flora in the reserve - ongoing enforcement of the prohibition against picking and collecting naturally-growing herbs and wild flowers in the area of the reserve.

Dealing with species of intrusive flora - over the years a few eucalyptus groves were planted in the reserve, from where eucalyptus seedlings spread along the stream. This tree, originating from Australia, grows to a great height and creates heavy shade and crowds out the local wild species. In recent years, some of the eucalyptus trees have been cut down in order to improve the ecological functioning of the reserve. Castor-oil-plants (Ricinus communis) and fir seedlings have also been uprooted, since they do not grow naturally in the reserve area.
Prevention of erosion - the steep slopes of the stream are prone to accelerated erosion, especially at the edges of the agricultural fields and the built-up areas of the Moshava Metula. In order to halt the erosion rocks have been piled up at certain points in the reserve.

Accessibility of the walking route - this included the construction of wooden bridges along the walking route and laying an accessible path for people who have difficulty in walking and for families coming with children in strollers.
Paddling pools - too many visitors and recreationers paddling in the water of the stream has an adverse effect on the quality of the water, causing the soil to float up and reducing the quantity of oxygen available for fish and invertebrates. The tendency of visitors to remove stones from the bottom of the pools also contributes to the disappearance of hiding places used by the fauna in the water. In order to improve visitors' experience and to limit their impact to a restricted area of the stream, three paddling pools were constructed in the vicinity of the camping/parking area, so that people can cool off in the cold water while lessening their effect on the eco-system.

Products specifications
Region North
Track Type Walking
Starting Point Ayun Bridge, Metula
Ending Point Hatanur Fall, Metula
Difficulty Level Easy
Trip Type Straight walking path
Suitable for Children Yes
Track Length 2.5 Km
Track Duration 1-2 Hours
Phone 972-4-6951519
URL http://www.parks.org.il/ParksAndReserves/iyonTanur/Pages/default.aspx
Email st-iyyon@npa.org.il
Accessibility Partially Accessible
Track Outline Straight
Best season All year long
Suitable for Picnics Yes
Drinkable Water Available
Parking Yes
Bathing Waters Yes
Special Equipment Shoes, Hat, Water
Precautions Do not stray off the track. Do not enter the water in the stream
Admission Charge Yes

After dozens of years in which the stream ran dry in summer due to Lebanon's diversion of the waters, the Nature and Parks Authority took action to renew the flow in the stream with the help of water pumped in from Nahal Dan, in order to rehabilitate the unique Nahal Ayun eco-system.

Day camping area for picnics in the northern area of the stream.

The gorge of Nahal Ayun and its waterfalls: Ayun Falls, the Mill Falls, the Cascades, and the Tanur Waterfall.

Pump at En Sukhra

Seasonal flowering of the Maritime Squill (Drimia Maritina)

The Tanur Lookout Point (Gafni) - observation point towards the Tanur Waterfall and downstream

Southern day-camping/parking area for picnics, and three paddling pools

Wheelchair-accessible path, for disabled persons and for children's strollers, from the day camping area up to the area of the Tanur Waterfall.

Ensuring the flow of water in summer - Nahal Ayun is a perennial stream that flows all year round. In the 20th century, Lebanese farmers began to exploit all the waters of the springs during the summer months and the Israeli part of the stream began to run dry in those months. For many years the falls would dry up in summer and the fish survived only in a number of deep shady pools. In the absence of a political solution for releasing the waters of the spring to flow in the stream, the Nature and Parks Authority initiated an artificial flow of water in the summer months by digging wells in the region of Nahal Dan and allowing the water to flow into Nahal Ayun. This project was begun in 2009 and has continued since then every year.

Monitoring species of fauna and flora in the reserve - in the waters of the stream live various species of invertebrates, some of them very rare. When water was fed artificially into the reserve in summer there was a concern that some of the unique natural values of the reserve would be accidentally harmed. In order to prevent such harm, seasonal studies and surveys are constantly conducted in the reserve, with the aim of examining the effect of the artificial flow of water on the sensitive eco-system. Certain groups of fauna are especially monitored: fish, water snails (the freshwater mollusc Melanopsis praemorsa) and others.

Interface with agriculture - the reserve borders on private agricultural land. Over the years there has been significant "agricultural pressure" on the reserve - agricultural land clearance for the expansion of plantations that intruded on the edges of the reserve area, and illegal hunting and trapping within and on the edges of the reserve. These occurrences require continuous supervision in order to stop ongoing damage to the reserve.
Protection of flora in the reserve - ongoing enforcement of the prohibition against picking and collecting naturally-growing herbs and wild flowers in the area of the reserve.

Dealing with species of intrusive flora - over the years a few eucalyptus groves were planted in the reserve, from where eucalyptus seedlings spread along the stream. This tree, originating from Australia, grows to a great height and creates heavy shade and crowds out the local wild species. In recent years, some of the eucalyptus trees have been cut down in order to improve the ecological functioning of the reserve. Castor-oil-plants (Ricinus communis) and fir seedlings have also been uprooted, since they do not grow naturally in the reserve area.
Prevention of erosion - the steep slopes of the stream are prone to accelerated erosion, especially at the edges of the agricultural fields and the built-up areas of the Moshava Metula. In order to halt the erosion rocks have been piled up at certain points in the reserve.

Accessibility of the walking route - this included the construction of wooden bridges along the walking route and laying an accessible path for people who have difficulty in walking and for families coming with children in strollers.
Paddling pools - too many visitors and recreationers paddling in the water of the stream has an adverse effect on the quality of the water, causing the soil to float up and reducing the quantity of oxygen available for fish and invertebrates. The tendency of visitors to remove stones from the bottom of the pools also contributes to the disappearance of hiding places used by the fauna in the water. In order to improve visitors' experience and to limit their impact to a restricted area of the stream, three paddling pools were constructed in the vicinity of the camping/parking area, so that people can cool off in the cold water while lessening their effect on the eco-system.

Products specifications
Region North
Track Type Walking
Starting Point Ayun Bridge, Metula
Ending Point Hatanur Fall, Metula
Difficulty Level Easy
Trip Type Straight walking path
Suitable for Children Yes
Track Length 2.5 Km
Track Duration 1-2 Hours
Phone 972-4-6951519
URL http://www.parks.org.il/ParksAndReserves/iyonTanur/Pages/default.aspx
Email st-iyyon@npa.org.il
Accessibility Partially Accessible
Track Outline Straight
Best season All year long
Suitable for Picnics Yes
Drinkable Water Available
Parking Yes
Bathing Waters Yes
Special Equipment Shoes, Hat, Water
Precautions Do not stray off the track. Do not enter the water in the stream
Admission Charge Yes
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